Shelf Fungus,  detail.  Property law books, mycelium, beeswax, local wildlife. Site specific installation after 2 years,. Smoke Farm, Arlington, WA    2009

Shelf Fungus, detail. 
Property law books, mycelium, beeswax, local wildlife.
Site specific installation after 2 years,.
Smoke Farm, Arlington, WA    2009

PLACE

We had a saying, taken from a review of the LoFi environmental art festival in a local weekly paper:  "Nature always wins."

In 2006, I was invited to show artwork as part of a festival at a place called Smoke Farm, a retired dairy farm north of Seattle with 360 acres of riverbank, pasture, blackberry bramble and forest; and a mission to restore the habitat of the floodplain and build community as part of the Rubicon Foundation.

Succeeding years saw me installing long-term site-specific work on the property, including my 2-year site-specific installation Shelf Fungus, which was eventually destroyed by a black bear cub; as well as becoming co-curator of the all-volunteer annual LoFi arts festival.

As curator and organizer, it became my job to translate my intimacy with the landscape for artists seeing it for the first time, to visit in May and help them see that 6” grass as being 6’ tall in August. To conceptualize works in the vast space and vibrating "thereness" of a natural setting and ask artists to work with, not against, nature. 

  Witness    Wildlife camera image of a Cooper's Hawk touching down at Hamm Creek.  Duwamish Revealed , Seattle, WA.   2015

Witness 
Wildlife camera image of a Cooper's Hawk touching down at Hamm Creek.
Duwamish Revealed, Seattle, WA.   2015

COMMUNITY

At Smoke Farm, we told stories around the fire at night and led walks to the mysterious squatter’s cabin, the active beaver dam, the old pear and cherry trees at the original homestead sites, debated the scat filled with cherry pits on the paths (coyote? Black bear?), and macheted the invasive blackberry and ivy back from the paths in the upper pasture.

We put an entire musical cabaret, including the piano, in a big maple tree; hosted a hand-cranked, 60' bellows sculpture that blew air over salvaged pipe organ pipes and sounded like a freight train in the mist, staged plays that happened on pallet rafts floating down the river, hosted a poet who performed her poetry with semaphore flags in a sea of grass, and hosted molecular gastronomy feasts in a treehouse where finding the maitre'd on a remote sandbar was the only way to secure a seat.  

  Red Light Nights  Monthly storefronts "experiences" offered for art walk in our clubhouse. Organized by Daryle Conners Canoe Social Club, Seattle, WA 2011

Red Light Nights
Monthly storefronts "experiences" offered for art walk in our clubhouse. Organized by Daryle Conners
Canoe Social Club, Seattle, WA 2011

SYNTHESIS

Through this experience at Smoke Farm, co-founding an artist social club called Canoe Social Club, creating site-specific art installations, and leading the urban arts activation program Storefronts Seattle; I had fallen in love with Place.  Specifically the observation, patience, and ingenuity required to install immersive, intensely site-specific artworks in an unpredictable and changing landscapes, whether rural, urban, or sociopolitical.  

To give voice to the "there," there.